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Hubble Deep Field Video
Download
A QuickTime version of the Hubble Deep Field Video is available for download in three sizes: small, medium, and large. To view the video in real time, select "small" for 56 kbps modem or slower, "medium" for ISDN, or "large" for cable, DSL, or T1. Otherwise, select "large" and view the video once the download is complete.
Hubble Deep Field Video

Description
Over ten consecutive days in December, 1995, the Hubble Space Telescope recorded the deepest view of the universe ever obtained. The resulting "Hubble Deep Field" image detects galaxies that are some four billion times fainter than can be seen by the naked eye. In early 1996, astronomers at the State University of New York at Stony Brook used a new technique based on galaxy colors to measure distances or "redshifts" of extremely faint galaxies in the Hubble Deep Field. The analysis determined distances of nearly 2500 galaxies, including the most distant objects ever observed. Because light travels at a fixed and finite speed, distant galaxies are seen as they were in the remote past. In particular, light from the most distant galaxies detected in the Hubble Deep Field image was emitted nearly 15 billion years ago, when the universe was less than 5% of its current age. In a very real sense, the Hubble Deep Field image is a sort of "time machine," recording the history of galaxy formation and evolution over some 95% of the age of the universe.
   The
Hubble Deep Field Video shows a journey through time and space toward the Hubble Deep Field. First, the galaxies are cast into the proper three-dimensional perspective, using actual distances measured by the Stony Brook team. Then, a journey through the field of galaxies is simulated as time recedes from the present toward the Big Bang. Finally, the scene fades to black as the most distant galaxies are passed, at the limit of our current knowledge of the distant universe. This is an utterly new and unique view of a portion of the real universe that has been made possible only as a result of recent technical advances.
   The video is organized into four clips. The first three clips pan across the Hubble Deep Field image, showing the dramatic variety of colors, shapes, and sizes of extremely faint galaxies. The fourth clip moves through the Hubble Deep Field image, starting at the present and ending at a time when the universe was only a few hundred million years old. Watch as the familiar spiral and elliptical galaxies of the present universe are passed, giving way to the small, compact regions of intense star light that are characteristic of galaxies in the distant, early universe. The video runs about 4 minutes, 36 seconds, and the fourth clip runs about 1 minute, 30 seconds.

Frequently Asked Questions
What does the video show? The video shows a journey through time and space toward the Hubble Deep Field, starting at the present and ending at a time when the universe was only a few hundred million years old.

Are the galaxies visible in the image real? Yes. Each and every galaxy visible in the image is a real galaxy in the real universe. The galaxies visible in the image were observed by the Hubble Space Telescope in December, 1995. The distances or "redshifts" of the galaxies visible in the image were measured by astronomers at the State University of New York at Stony Brook in early 1996. The galaxies visible in the image include the faintest and most distant objects ever observed.

Are the colors of the galaxies correct? It depends. The image is made from light at visible through near-infrared wavelengths, whereas the human eye is sensitive to light at visible but not near-infrared wavelengths. (Besides, motion toward the galaxies at the impossibly large speed implied by the Hubble Deep Field Video would give rise to an impossibly large Doppler blue shift.) But the colors of the galaxies roughly approximate the colors that would be seen by a human eye at rest at the present, if the human eye were far more sensitive than it actually is.

Are there any stars visible in the image? Yes, a few. The Hubble Deep Field points almost directly out of the plane of our Milky Way galaxy, where the incidence of stars is very low. There are about a dozen stars scattered across the image, although the vast majority of the several thousand objects visible in the Hubble Deep Field image are galaxies.


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Hubble Deep Field Video Tape
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Credits
Hubble Deep Field Video: Produced by Kenneth M. Lanzetta, Kristen Moore, Alberto Fernandez-Soto, and Amos Yahil at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. Copyright © 1997 Kenneth M. Lanzetta.

Hubble Deep Field Video soundtrack: Solar Quest: "Singtree." Written and produced by Solar Quest. Published by Les Editions de la Bascule/Strictly Confidential. Courtesy of SSR/Crammed Discs. http://www.crammed.be

Astrographics 2004 Product Catalog

Gallery of the Hubble Space Telescope
Hubble Deep Field Video

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